Technology Insights

Top 10 Innovations for 2019

Alex Stockham

Alex Stockham

Communications Manager – IN-PART, London Office.

Ten innovations being developed by academic researchers that captured the most attention from our global R&D community in 2018.

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A renewable and biodegradable plastic

Top 10 Innovations for 2019 - IN-PART - Blog Features Circle - 500px 1

An ecologically-friendly alternative to petroleum-derived plastics, these high-strength bioplastics are made primarily of lignin, one of the most abundant biopolymers on earth, and exhibit comparable and superior properties to polystyrene and acrylic. Developed by researchers at the University of Minnesota.

To learn more about the 1st of our top 10 innovations for 2019, read the full article on IN-PART.


A non-invasive, widely universal, early-stage cancer diagnostic

 Top 10 Innovations for 2019 - IN-PART - Blog Features Circle - 500px 2An early-stage cancer diagnostic that works by detecting highly correlated regions of DNA methylation (a signal of high rates of DNA mutation) in blood using Next Generation Sequencing tailored to the methylation signatures of a wide range of tumour types and stages. Developed by researchers at Queen’s University.

To learn more about the 2nd of our top 10 innovations for 2019, read the full article on IN-PART.


High-resolution tactile sensing for precise robotics

 Top 10 Innovations for 2019 - IN-PART - Blog Features Circle - 500px 3An integrated sensor system and associated learning algorithms that provide robotic grippers with high-resolution, adaptive tactile sensing across arbitrarily-shaped surfaces by combining a continuous array of electrodes within a flexible, piezoresistive polymer. Developed by researchers at Columbia University.

To learn more about the 3rd of our top 10 innovations for 2019, read the full article on IN-PART.


Spinning semiconductors into yarns

 Top 10 Innovations for 2019 - IN-PART - Blog Features Circle - 500px 4A scalable manufacturing process that embeds RFID (radio-frequency identification) semiconductor chips within textile yarns, which can then be incorporated directly into fabrics for more robust ID tagging. Developed by researchers at Nottingham Trent University.

To learn more about the 4th of our top 10 innovations for 2019, read the full article on IN-PART.


Identifying the right amino acid

 Top 10 Innovations for 2019 - IN-PART - Blog Features Circle - 500px 4A DNA amplification system that addresses the shortcomings of PCR and clone generation for sequencing nucleic acids, along with a new method to immobilize nucleic acids that offers precise identification of nucleic acids for diagnostic and forensic applications. Developed by researchers at The Ohio State University.

To learn more about the 5th of our top 10 innovations for 2019, read the full article on IN-PART.


Making use of white space frequencies

 Top 10 Innovations for 2019 - IN-PART - Blog Features Circle - 500px 6A compact, high-efficiency antenna that utilises the white space frequency spectrum to provide an effective means for cross-device, short-range communication in rural, remote, and temporary locations. Developed by researchers at Queen Mary University of London.

To learn more about the 6th of our top 10 innovations for 2019, read the full article on IN-PART.


New leads to tackle AMR superbugs

 Top 10 Innovations for 2019 - IN-PART - Blog Features Circle - 500px 76A series of proprietary polymixin analogues identified to be active against gram-negative ‘superbugs’, with the lead candidate demonstrating superior in vivo efficacy and safety. Developed by researchers at Monash University.

To learn more about the 7th of our top 10 innovations for 2019, read the full article on IN-PART.


A faster alternative to the Fourier transform

 Top 10 Innovations for 2019 - IN-PART - Blog Features Circle - 500px 8This algorithm identifies changes in the number and structure of the underlying waves that make up a signal and has been repurposed from its original design to remove background noise in gravitational wave detectors, for applications in turbine performance monitoring, microgenerator synchronisation, and mobile/satellite communications. Developed by researchers at the University of Sheffield.

To learn more about the 8th of our top 10 innovations for 2019, read the full article on IN-PART.


A fire retardant aerogel

 Top 10 Innovations for 2019 - IN-PART - Blog Features Circle - 500px 9An ultra-lightweight, thermally insulating, fire retardant nanocellulose aerogel (a renewable and abundant biopolymer) designed for energy optimisation and safety in the construction, transportation, and aerospace industries. Developed by researchers at Northeastern University.

To learn more about the 9th of our top 10 innovations for 2019, read the full article on IN-PART.


A non-invasive, wearable glucose monitor

Top 10 Innovations for 2019 - IN-PART - Blog Features Circle - 500px 10A new family of materials that display a change in optical properties in the presence of sugars, for real-time, continuous detection of glucose with numerous applications in the biomedical and wearable technology fields. Developed by researchers at Dublin City University.

To learn more about the 10th of our top 10 innovations for 2019, read the full article on IN-PART.


Copyrights reserved unless otherwise agreed – IN-PART Publishing Ltd. 2018

Written by Emma and Alex.


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